SEND Information Report

February 2016 to January 2017

SENCO: Mrs S Lord (Maternity Cover)/ Mrs E Walker                                                   SEN Governor: Pat Greenall

Contact: 0161 6434009

Local Offer Contribution: http://www.rochdale.gov.uk/schools-and-education/special-educational-needs/Pages/send—the-local-offer.aspx

Whole School Approach:

As a Catholic school we are proud of our inclusive nature and are committed to providing the best possible learning opportunities for students of all abilities. We have a dedicated and highly experienced team working in our Additional Needs department to ensure all students receive the support they require to be successful.

High quality first teaching and additional interventions are defined through our annual dialogue across the school contributing to our provision management approach. These documents help us to regularly review and record what we offer EVERY child or young person in our care and what we offer additionally. These discussions also serve to embed our high expectations among staff about quality first teaching and the application of a differentiated and personalised approach to teaching and learning. We make it a point to discuss aspirations with all our learners.

Underpinning ALL our provision in school is the graduated approach cycle of:whole school approach

All teachers are responsible for every child in their care, including those with special educational needs.
(Reference: Teaching & Learning Policy 2015-2018)

Assess: The class teacher will use assessments, classwork, homework etc. to look for progress which:

  • is significantly slower than that of their peers starting from the same baseline
  • fails to match or better the child’s previous rate of progress
  • fails to close the attainment gap between the child and their peers
  • widens the attainment gap

The teacher will then make a referral if they are concerned that the student may have SEN. Further specialised assessments will be undertaken by a member of the Additional Needs Department to further inform planning.

Plan: The relevant members of staff will meet and decide the best course of action to take. This is child-centred and the parents and students are fully involved. A plan will be decided on and the intervention agreed.

Do: Dependent on the decided intervention, the student will be referred to the correct staff/agencies.

Review: Each intervention has its own review cycle, as detailed on the provision map. The student will be reviewed and the appropriate action will be determined.

Having consulted with children, young people and their parents, all our additional provision (internal or external) is based on an agreed outcomes approach.

SEN Needs:

Children and young people’s SEN are generally thought of in the following four broad areas of need and support:

1. Communication and interaction

Children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) have difficulty in communicating with others. This may be because they have difficulty saying what they want to, understanding what is being said to them or they do not understand or use social rules of communication. The profile for every child with SLCN is different and their needs may change over time. They may have difficulty with one, some or all of the different aspects of speech, language or social communication at different times of their lives. Children and young people with ASD, including Asperger’s Syndrome and Autism, are likely to have particular difficulties with social interaction. They may also experience difficulties with language, communication and imagination, which can impact on how they relate to others.

2. Cognition and learning

Support for learning difficulties may be required when children and young people learn at a slower pace than their peers, even with appropriate differentiation. Learning difficulties cover a wide range of needs, including moderate learning difficulties (MLD), severe learning difficulties (SLD), where children are likely to need support in all areas of the curriculum and associated difficulties with mobility and communication, through to profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD), where children are likely to have severe and complex learning difficulties as well as a physical disability or sensory impairment. Specific learning difficulties (SpLD), affect one or more specific aspects of learning. This encompasses a range of conditions such as dyslexia, dyscalculia and dyspraxia.

3. Social, emotional and mental health

Children and young people may experience a wide range of social and emotional difficulties which manifest themselves in many ways. These may include becoming withdrawn or isolated, as well as displaying challenging, disruptive or disturbing behaviour. These behaviours may reflect underlying mental health difficulties such as anxiety or depression, self-harming, substance misuse, eating disorders or physical symptoms that are medically unexplained. Other children and young people may have disorders such as attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder or attachment disorder. Schools and colleges should have clear processes to support children and young people, including how they will manage the effect of any disruptive behaviour so it does not adversely affect other pupils.

4. Sensory and/or physical needs

Some children and young people require special educational provision because they have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of the educational facilities generally provided. These difficulties can be age related and may fluctuate over time. Many children and young people with vision impairment (VI), hearing impairment (HI) or a multi-sensory impairment (MSI) will require specialist support and/or equipment to access their learning, or habilitation support. Children and young people with an MSI have a combination of vision and hearing difficulties. Some children and young people with a physical disability (PD) require additional on-going support and equipment to access all the opportunities available to their peers.

 

School Offer

Transition

  • Additional Needs Coordinator attends Annual Reviews and Transition Reviews for students with a Statement or EHC Plan
  • Additional Needs Coordinator will meet with parents and students who have a diagnosis to personalise a transition package
  • Specialist link teacher to feeder primaries
  • Open Evening for Year 5 and 6
  • Additional Needs Coordinator visits primary schools
  • Individual parental visits when requested
  • Transition visits for pupils with a statement or an EHC Plan coordinated with the primary schools
  • Student transition day
  • Induction evening for parents

Year 7

  • Specialist De La Salle building
  • Settling-in evening for parents
  • In-class support provided by LPAs
  • All students with a statement or EHC Plan are allocated a key worker
  • Personalised timetables
  • Literacy programme – withdrawal from lessons
  • Literacy and numeracy support during registration
  • Mixed ability classes in Maths
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Support from Educational Psychologist and RANS
  • Pyramid club
  • Homework Club

Year 8

  • In-class support provided by LPAs
  • Key worker support
  • Literacy programme
  • Literacy and numeracy support during registration
  • Ability sets in maths
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Support from Educational Psychologist and RANS
  • Options Evening
  • Homework Club

Year 9

  • In-class support provided by LPAs
  • Key worker support
  • Literacy and numeracy support during registration
  • Ability sets in maths
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Support from Educational Psychologist and RANS
  • Homework Club

Year 10

  • In-class support provided by LPAs
  • Key worker support
  • Literacy and numeracy support during registration
  • Ability sets in maths
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Support from Educational Psychologist and RANS
  • Testing for access arrangements for exams
  • Homework Club

Year 11

  • In-class support provided by LPAs
  • Key worker support
  • Literacy and numeracy support during registration
  • Ability sets in maths
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Support from Educational Psychologist and RANS
  • Testing for access arrangements for exams
  • Homework Club

Sixth Form

  • Sixth Form Ambassador support
  • Caritas worker
  • DASH handwriting assessment
  • Dyslexia Screener
  • Visual stress test
  • Testing for access arrangements for exams

As of February 2016, we have 98 children or young people receiving SEN Support.

We have internal processes for monitoring quality of provision and assessment of need.

Consulting with children, young people and their parents

Involving parents and learners in the dialogue is central to our approach and we do this through keeping everyone involved in the process. Parents are informed when their child is on the SEN register and when they are exited, if appropriate.

Staff development

We are committed to developing the ongoing expertise of our staff. We have current expertise in our school:

Staff
Role
S Lord (Mat Cover)/E Walker Assistant Head in charge of Additional Needs and SENCO
K Foster Additional Needs Coordinator
KEY WORKERS
J Beaumont Key Worker specialising in bereavement and self-harm
C Seville Key Worker specialising in literacy and Down’s Syndrome
H Farrell Key Worker specialising in LAC and Attachment Disorder
L Ramsbottom Key Worker specialising in ASD
M Skorzewski Key Worker specialising in Communication (inc. ASD) and EAL
J Sweeney Key Worker specialising in Safeguarding and Drug/Alcohol Awareness
LEARNING PROGRESS ASSISTANTS
J Ward Department Link for RE
H Gorman Department Link for ICT
A Robinson Department Link for D&T
J Hawker Department Link for English
V Smith Department Link for English
S Rogers Department Link for Maths
L Caveney Department Link for Maths
D Wellens Department Link for Science
A Walsh Department Link for Science
J Moorcroft Learning Progress Assistant
L Farrell
Learning Progress Assistant
C Brown Learning Progress Assistant
H Stoker Learning Progress Assistant
J Stansfield Learning Progress Assistant
J Cooper Learning Progress Assistant

This year, we have put in additional training into understanding data, the appraisal process and developing staffs areas of expertise.

Staff deployment

Considerable thought, planning and preparation goes into utilising our support staff to ensure children achieve the best outcomes, gain independence and are prepared for adulthood from the earliest possible age.

The timetable for the LPAs is a careful and well-thought process where the needs of the students are put first. We aim to have the department-linked LPA working in that area as much as possible rather than with a particular student. This helps the students to develop independence and confidence in their learning.

School Admissions

Children with Statements of Special Educational Needs/EHC Plans

Where pupils have a statement of Special Educational Needs/EHC Plan that names a specific school, the Governing Body has a statutory duty to admit those pupils. This means that children with such a Statement of Special Educational Needs will be allocated a place before any other places are allocated.

Looked-After Children and Previously Looked-After Children

A Looked-After Child is a child who is (a) in the care of a Local Authority, or (b) being provided with accommodation by a Local Authority in the exercise of their Social Services functions under section 22(1) of the Children Act 1989.

A previously Looked-After Child is one who immediately moved on from that status after becoming subject to an adoption, residence or special guardianship order.

(Reference: Admissions Policy 2016)

School Partnerships and Transitions

Our academic assessment for children and young people with special educational needs is moderated through our cluster of schools and neighbouring partners.

This year, we worked with our feeder partners to welcome 10 children and young people with special educational needs or disabilities and we supported 25 children and young people transition to the next phase in education or employment.

We closely monitor children and young people’s destination data.

Complaints

Our complaints procedure is in line with the schools policy.

 

Relevant school policies underpinning this SEN Information Report include:

Admission Policy 2016

Admission Policy 2015

Anti-Bullying Policy

Complaints Policy & Procedure

Safeguarding Policy

School Safety Policy 2016-17

SEN Policy

Teaching and Learning Policy

Legislative Acts taken into account when compiling this report include:

  • Children & Families Act 2014
  • Equality Act 2010
  • Mental Capacity Act 2005